Entry Title: "Dead Wood"
Name: Andrew Robert Brown , United Kingdom
Category and Expertise: Self-Promotion, Non-Professional


Entry Description: Many years ago man planted these now burnt tree stumps along the edge of a reservoir. A shift of stance reveals their neatly sewn lines, yet there is only decay now.

About the Artist:

An ardent devotee to most genres of landscape and black and white photography, my primary fervour and passion is for mono and split-toned, ultra long exposure imagery. A lifetime resident of Devon in England, I live equidistant to the rugged and varied coastlines of Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset and can generally be found on a beach somewhere (most likely balancing my tripod precariously amidst some rocks) all year round. Despite always having a passion and appreciation for the printed image, I'm a relative newcomer to the art of capturing a scene indelibly myself – having only started taking images seriously in 2008. I've now exhibited some of my work locally, and several of my photographs have been published in local and national magazines, most recently Amateur Photographer, Digital SLR User and Practical Photography, in addition to being showcased on numerous web-based platforms. My biggest success to date has been winning a place in the UK's Landscape Photographer Of The Year 2012 competition, securing a place in the awards book and a slot at the exhibition throughout the winter of 2011 at the National Theatre in London. I participate actively in online forums, most notable flickr where I moderate and contribute to groups, as well as www.landscapemagazine.com, a subscription based online publication which I write articles for. I'm typically drawn to bold compositions, often concentrating the eye squarely on one key subject reinforced by understated, secondary elements. Movement is a key feature, perhaps registering in the stirring of grasses or drifting cloud formations. The majority of my exposures are measured by minutes, as opposed to fractions of a second – a conscious decision on my part to record the passing of time as a contrasting, single instant.