Entry Title: "The Impossibility of Love"
Name: Kila Rusharc , United Kingdom
Category and Expertise: Still Life|Landscapes|Deeper Perspective, Student


Entry Description: In the series 'The Impossibility of Love' Kila & Rusharc construct contemporary dreamscapes that combine artificial objects and organic matter to explore the frequently paradoxical relationship between desire and delusion. Referencing classical painting, 70s fantasy illustration and Sci-Fi films, real stage sets are constructed interweaving landscapes captured specifically for the series, which are then projected onto giant backdrops. Each piece addresses the specific temporalities of different emotional states. Within the series, possibility becomes more than the necessity of recognising our material limits, it is a challenge to look again, with wonder, at the horizon lines of our physical and emotional landscapes.

Story: In the series 'The Impossibility of Love' Kila & Rusharc embark on a conceptual journey venturing through fantastical terrains searching for the parameters of possibility. Through the construction of contemporary dreamscapes that combine artificial objects and organic matter, Kila & Rusharc explore the original impulse of the Surrealist's concept of L’Amour Fou (Mad Love). The photographers use this notion, adopted by André Breton in the 1920s to describe what drives someone to abandon everything in the pursuit of desire, to explore the frequently paradoxical relationship between desire and delusion. Working with the Surrealist’s interest in the edges of experience, the photographers have developed new lines of inquiry by drawing on science facts and fictions, the natural world and phenomenon of the magical. They aim to negotiate where traditional scientific modes of expression end and where the art of emotion begins. Using a colour palette sourced from geological rock and mineral formations, their exploration of science’s concern with the rational begins to question the very logic of our desire. This practice is refracted through the prism of Kila & Rusharc's personal experiences.  The photographers adopt and adapt a host of visual traditions including classical painting, 70s fantasy illustration and Sci-Fi films. Real stage sets are constructed interweaving landscapes captured specifically for the series, which are then projected onto giant backdrops. In each multilayered composition temporal concerns meet with spatial ones through the ambiguities of scale, forcing the viewer to question what really exists and what is the projected.  The objects in the images seem to balance precariously, offset by the internal logic of each construction. Partially referencing consumer culture and object desire, the process of production, as much as the final image, acknowledges the cycle of consumption and abandonment. In these, not so still, still lives, action is also central. Whether movement occurs as slowly as the slide of molasses or with the speed of a burning meteorite, each piece addresses the specific temporalities of different emotional states.  The title ‘The Impossibility of Love’ seems, on first encounter, to be a statement of the unobtainable, the fruitless…the hungry. And yet, such intense emotion can also defy, allude or replenish, keeping its subjects in a constant state of flux. Within the series, possibility becomes more than the necessity of recognising our material limits, but a challenge to look again, with wonder, at the horizon lines of our physical and emotional landscapes.

About the Artist:

Alessandra Chila and Philip Rusharc started their collaboration in 2012 after meeting whilst studying at the University of Westminster in London. Working under the name Kila & Rusharc, their mutual interests in science and the natural world, combined with a fascination for the artificial and what is artifice, has lead the photographers to create their own unique visual language. Investigating the genre of still life to its outer limits, the team explore emotion in all it's universal states. Alessandra received a scholarship to study a Masters in Photographic Studies. She has exhibited in various group shows and had her first solo show in Charleroi, Belgium in 2011. Her work has been published and analyzed in academic journals and books on visual culture. She has also self-published books and has been part of various talks and symposia on the function of photographic images in urban change, considering photographs as documents and the prevarications and representations of sites in transition.  Following a career in Publishing, Philip is currently studying BA Photography at the University of Westminster under a scholarship program. In the series 'The Impossibility of Love' Kila & Rusharc embark on a conceptual journey venturing through fantastical terrains searching for the parameters of possibility. Through the construction of contemporary dreamscapes that combine artificial objects and organic matter, Kila & Rusharc explore the original impulse of the Surrealist's concept of L’Amour Fou (Mad Love). The photographers use this notion, adopted by André Breton in the 1920s to describe what drives someone to abandon everything in the pursuit of desire, to explore the frequently paradoxical relationship between desire and delusion. Working with the Surrealist’s interest in the edges of experience, the photographers have developed new lines of inquiry by drawing on science facts and fictions, the natural world and phenomenon of the magical. They aim to negotiate where traditional scientific modes of expression end and where the art of emotion begins. Using a colour palette sourced from geological rock and mineral formations, their exploration of science’s concern with the rational begins to question the very logic of our desire. This practice is refracted through the prism of Kila & Rusharc's personal experiences.  The photographers adopt and adapt a host of visual traditions including classical painting, 70s fantasy illustration and Sci-Fi films. Real stage sets are constructed interweaving landscapes captured specifically for the series, which are then projected onto giant backdrops. In each multilayered composition temporal concerns meet with spatial ones through the ambiguities of scale, forcing the viewer to question what really exists and what is the projected.  The objects in the images seem to balance precariously, offset by the internal logic of each construction. Partially referencing consumer culture and object desire, the process of production, as much as the final image, acknowledges the cycle of consumption and abandonment. In these, not so still, still lives, action is also central. Whether movement occurs as slowly as the slide of molasses or with the speed of a burning meteorite, each piece addresses the specific temporalities of different emotional states.  The title ‘The Impossibility of Love’ seems, on first encounter, to be a statement of the unobtainable, the fruitless…the hungry. And yet, such intense emotion can also defy, allude or replenish, keeping its subjects in a constant state of flux. Within the series, possibility becomes more than the necessity of recognising our material limits, but a challenge to look again, with wonder, at the horizon lines of our physical and emotional landscapes.